Never-Before-Seen Photographic Evidence of Horrible 1937 Nanjing Massacre Has Just Been Unearthed

Evan Kail, the owner of St. Louis Park Gold & Silver, a precious metals dealer in Minnesota, receives packages every day. Most of them contain assorted coins, jewelry, and other miscellaneous items – commodities you’d expect at a pawn shop. On August 29, 2022, however, Kail received a once-lost historical artifact that revealed war crimes once thought to be non-existent.

According the new yorker, the 33-year-old was rummaging through a box of objects when he came across an album of war photographs. The album was bound in leather and featured two distinctive dragons on the front. The photos inside appear to have been stitched together by a US Navy sailor who wanted to capture his tour of the Western Pacific in the 1930s.

Kail decided to document her findings on her TikTok account @pawn.man, and viewers were quickly horrified by the contents of the photo album. The video, which has now amassed more than 30 million views, shows the pawnshop owner flipping through the album and revealing the disturbing nature of the footage inside.

The man explained how, at the beginning of the album, the American sailor documented incredibly vivid moments of life in 1930s Southeast Asia. However, the images quickly turn into something much more sinister. As the book begins to change and show more war-related content, Kail turned the camera to her face and said, “I can’t show you past this page.”

@pawn.man

PLEASE HELP #nankingmassacre #historicalphotos #worldwar2 #pawnman #museumtreasure

♬ original sound – Pawn Master Kail

But it wasn’t long before the pages he was referring to were posted on Twitter and the images inside depict what can only be described as “human carnage”. The photographs – which have since been removed – capture the remains of bomb victims, a decapitated man, a charred and discarded corpse and many other scenes of horror and slaughter spill over the pages – creating an all too realistic portrayal of the suffering that has taken place. Graphic images of a Lingchi public executions – known to Westerners as “death by a thousand cuts” – are even included.

But it wasn’t long before the pages he was referring to were posted on Twitter and the images inside depict what can only be described as “human carnage”. The photographs – which have since been removed – capture the remains of bomb victims, a decapitated man, a charred and discarded corpse and many other scenes of horror and slaughter spill over the pages – creating an all too realistic portrayal of the suffering that has taken place. Graphic images of a Lingchi public executions – known to Westerners as “death by a thousand cuts” – are even included.

The location of the site of this destruction is also made possible by the road signs displayed in many photographs. The “Nanjing Road” can be spotted in the background, allowing us to pinpoint the site of these extreme wartime atrocities.

For those of you who may not be aware, Nanjing, now known as Nanjing, was the scene of a large-scale massacre in 1937. Although often dismissed or downplayed by public authorities, the ‘Rape of Nanjing‘ is a dark stain in history that should not be minimized or forgotten. The Chinese city was infiltrated by Japanese troops in December 1937, and for six weeks bands of soldiers massacred, raped, looted and tormented its inhabitants.

It has been estimated that at least 20,000 women were raped and many of these victims were brutally mutilated after their “goal” was achieved. Bodies were dumped in bulk along rivers, and soldiers’ methods of execution became more lethal every day, ranging from hacking victims to death to coating them in gasoline and burning them alive.

The Japanese government has always denied that the massacre ever took place. In 2000, The Guardian signaled public outrage in response to a controversial conference held in Osaka, Japan, titled The Verification of the Nanjing Rape: The Biggest Lie of the 20th Century.

While survivors of the massacre had gatOutside the conference, one victim, Liu Xiuling, said, “They say I am lying, I say I best represent the victims of the massacre because I still have wounds on my body, wounds on my face , wounds on the legs. Can you deny it?

Since discovering the photo album, Kail has posted an update to his TikTok account explaining how he intends to locate a museum in China to ensure the preservation of the book and hopefully provide information. concrete evidence of this traumatic moment in history.

@pawn.man

Update on my WWII photo book #worldwar2 #historytok #empireofjapan #pawnman

♬ original sound – Pawn Master Kail

It should be noted that since Kail presented his findings, a number of prominent historians have questioned the validity of the images. The photographs, after being posted on Twitter, were quickly questioned by historian Jo Hedwig. Teeuwisse, as reported by BNC News.

Teeuwisse, who has also acted as a historical consultant on a number of television shows and films, warned that although the album genuinely appeared to date from the 1930s, the photos included were potentially printed and widely distributed, which that the soldier was likely to have. purchased and added to the album, thus calling into question the authenticity of the images and their place in the Nanjing chronology.

Despite these possibilities, educating individuals about this historic event and acknowledging the atrocities that were committed is undoubtedly a step in the right direction.

Michael E. Marquez